Solar 3D printer converts waste water into furniture!

"No trash, no plastic, in seas and coasts," said Petros the Pelican. But because we didn’t hear his advice and our oceans are full of plastic waste, a 3D printer came to save the day!

Neither a machine God, nor God’s machine. In fact, a machine by Alexander Groves and Azusa Murakami who have vowed to contribute to the cleanliness of the oceans!

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Due to the enormous contamination in vast oceans of our planet we have created large and small garbage islands. One of the largest, the Great Pacific garbage patch, is about the size of … Turkey! The garbage spot located in the North Pacific and consists mainly of plastic waste, micro-particles, petrochemicals and other coarse polluting materials. Because of the volume has repeatedly won the attention of environmentalists and researchers, and obviously the aforementioned authors.photo-original

In an effort cleaning this gigantic chaos, the Studio Swine of Groves and Murakami had a brilliant idea: to design a solar fired  3D printer that uses plastic waste to print … furniture!

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Alex and Azusa started from Cornwall, picking up plastic waste from the coast and then building their own machine to shred the garbage. The resultant material, was the substance used by the 3D printer to print their first project, a chair with three legs, the Sea Chair. The next task waiting for them on the open sea, where they came out with a fishing boat and nets, they collected as much plastic trash as possible. Ultimately, through the experiences and their cooperation with a specialist mechanical, they managed to make the solar powered 3D printer, which can move and work anywhere!

 

 

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Alex and Azusa succeeded in early October to win funding from Kickstarter, so traveling at this time in one of the largest sources of recyclable plastics in the world. Their average is the Sea Dragon, a sailing vessel of steel, equipped with laboratory microscopes and trawl nets to collect plastic garbage. The Sea Dragon has length 22 meters and has already come out for exploration in the North Atlantic.

Source: 4green.gr